REDD+

Browse submissions

Information shared in the REDD+ web platform by

Search submissions

Back to topic overview

Financing


Submissions related to Financing

World Wide Fund for Nature (WWF) January 2016

INDC Analysis: An Overview of the Forest Sector

Current commitments to reduce greenhouse-gas emissions fall far short of what is needed to prevent dangerous levels of climate change. According to the United Nations Environment Programme, the Intended Nationally Determined Contributions (INDCs) submitted by countries to date would likely result in a catastrophic global average temperature rise of 3-3.5°C, even if all conditional targets were met. But more ambitious action to protect forests and restore degraded lands could go a long way towards closing the gap between current proposals and what science says is needed. WWF’s report INDC Analysis: An Overview of the Forest Sector looks at the plans countries have laid out for reducing emissions from forest loss, and identifies opportunities for forest countries and donors to make a bigger contribution. The report analyses the INDCs submitted by 75 developing countries or emerging economies which account for the vast majority of tropical forest cover. “While the proposed measures vary widely, overall countries recognize the vital importance of the forest sector within their INDCs,” said Josefina Brana-Varela, head of policy for WWF’s Forest and Climate Programme. “But to realize the full global mitigation potential, many countries still need to clarify and strengthen their intended forest sector contributions.” Of the INDCs analysed, over half establish one or more concrete goals in the forest sector. These include targets for afforestation, reforestation and restoration; to maintain and/or increase forest cover; for sustainable forest management; and to increase the uptake of improved cook stoves, which use less firewood. The review highlights a number of ways to augment the role that various forest conservation and restoration actions can play in reducing the emissions gap. These actions can also help countries adapt to climate change and achieve wider sustainable development goals. “Forested developing countries should include clear, comprehensive mitigation targets and transparent financial needs in their INDCs,” added Brana-Varela. “This will help forge partnerships with potential donors, and enable them to make a major contribution to closing the emissions gap.”

English External link

UN-REDD Programme February 2016

REDD+ Academy Learning Journals

This comprehensive REDD+ learning resource addresses 12 key topics in REDD+: Forest, Carbon Sequestration and Climate Change; Understanding REDD+ and the UNFCCC; Drivers of Deforestation and Forest Degradation; National Strategies and Action Plans; National Forest Monitoring Systems; Forest Reference Emission Levels; Policies and Measures for REDD+ Implementation; REDD+ Safeguards; REDD+ Finance; Approaches for Allocation of Incentives; Stakeholder Engagement; Good Governance.

English, French, Spanish External link

UN-REDD Programme February 2016

Business Case for Mainstreaming Gender in REDD+

Promoting a human rights-based approach to development requires UN-REDD partner institutions to ensure that their support for REDD+ promotes good practices and does not perpetuate or exacerbate existing inequalities between women and men. Toward this end, “the Business case for Mainstreaming Gender in REDD+” demonstrates why the unique role of women in protecting and managing forests— and ensuring their equal access to resources—is an important component for a more equitable, effective and efficient REDD+. Through this effort we hope to establish a greater base of evidence that will help policy-makers, practitioners and others understand the critical influence that gender-differentiated needs, uses and knowledge have on REDD+ policy and programming on the ground.

English PDF 3.10 MB

World Wide Fund for Nature (WWF) December 2015

Expectations Paper COP21 Paris

The 2015 UN climate change conference in Paris (COP21) is a pivotal moment. Governments have set December 2015 as the deadline to agree on a new climate regime for 2020 onwards. This deal must give the world a fighting chance to avoid dangerous global temperature rises. Such an agreement needs to be fair, ambitious, and transformational. At the same time, COP21 provides an opportunity to showcase efforts that countries, the private sector, and civil society are making to combat climate change – and to accelerate and scale up these actions.

English External link

World Wide Fund for Nature (WWF) December 2015

PROJET DE DOCUMENT SUR LES ATTENTES DE LA COP 21 DE PARIS

La conférence de l’ONU sur le changement climatique de 2015 qui se tiendra à Paris (COP21) est un moment charnière. Les États se sont fixé comme date limite décembre 2015 pour s’accorder sur un nouveau régime climat pour la période après 2020.

French External link

World Wide Fund for Nature (WWF) December 2015

PROYECTO DE DOCUMENTO DE EXPECTATIVAS DE LA COP 21 DE PARÍS

La Conferencia de las Naciones Unidas sobre el Cambio Climático de 2015 (COP21) es un momento fundamental. Los gobiernos han fijado diciembre de 2015 como plazo para ponerse de acuerdo sobre un nuevo régimen climático para después de 2020.

Spanish External link

Forest Trends January 2016

REDD+ Finance Flows 2009-2014: Trends and Lessons Learned in REDDX Countries

The study follows the money trail in 13 countries that account for 65 percent of the globe’s tropical forest cover under the U.N.’s REDD+ initiative. The research by Forest Trends’ REDDX (REDD eXpenditures) initiative covers six years from 2009 to 2014. It tracks more than $6 billion of the nearly $10 billion that has been committed or pledged to REDD+ programs globally. Key findings of the new report show that of the $3.7 billion committed, 60 percent or $2.2 billion came directly from individual donor countries. Norway, the largest donor by far, has contributed nearly half of all those funds; Germany, Japan and the United States committed a combined total of $730 million; and the U.K., Australia and France contributed most of the remainder. The private sector contributed 10 percent of all REDD+ finance commitments tracked in these 13 countries. Brazil and Indonesia together received nearly two-thirds of all funding pledged or committed. The big winner that has received the most money thus far is Brazil’s Amazon Fund, which had received $867 million from Norway by the end of 2014. Payments of promised funds have grown steadily, with 62 percent of all committed funds paid out by the end of 2014. Most of the money has gone directly to government agencies, with small amounts supporting the work of international organizations. The percentage of payments paid out to participating countries varies dramatically, from Brazil, which has received 91 percent of its promised funding, to Mexico, which has gotten only 5 percent of the money pledged to it.

English PDF 5.22 MB

UN-REDD Programme February 2016

BOLETÍN DE POLÍTICAS: Incentivos fiscales a la producción agrícola: opciones para forjar una compatibilidad con REDD+

Este Boletín de políticas describe opciones para forjar una compatibilidad entre los incentivos fiscales a la producción agrícola y REDD+.

Spanish PDF 8.32 MB

UN-REDD Programme February 2016

Info Brief: Banking on REDD+: Can bank and investor risk policies on soft commodities benefit REDD+?

This Info Brief assesses whether and how soft commodity risk policies by banks and investors could potentially benefit UN-REDD countries to achieve REDD+ results based on an analysis of risk policies from a range of financial institutions. This brief has been produced in parallel with a report by UNEP (2015) titled ‘Bank and Investor Risk Policies on Soft Commodities\' that approaches the same topic from the angle of the financial industry, providing greater clarity what criteria banks and investors can adopt in risk policies to reduce the probability of clients having significant impacts on (tropical) forest ecosystems from soy, palm oil and beef production.

English PDF 10.38 MB

The Center for People and Forests (RECO... August 2015

Forests and Climate Change after Lima: An Asia-Pacific Perspective

English PDF 1.62 MB

October 2015

O nível de referência de emissões florestais do Brasil para pagamentos por resultados de redução de emissões provenientes do desmatamento no bioma Amazônia

O Brasil é responsável por expressivos resultados de redução de emissões de CO 2 provenientes do desmatamento no bioma Amazônia. ™ A formalização das ações nacionais de redução das emissões de gases de efeito estufa provenientes do desmatamento e degradação florestal, incluindo o papel da conservação florestal, do manejo sustentável de florestas e do aumento dos estoques de carbono florestal (REDD+) é um requisito para o reconhecimento dos resultados alcançados no âmbito da Convenção-Quadro das Nações Unidas sobre Mudança do Clima (UNFCCC). ™ O nível de referência de emissões florestais (FREL) é o referencial a partir do qual o resultado das ações de REDD+ é medido. ™ A submissão do FREL por países em desenvolvimento é voluntária, sendo, porém, um dos requisitos de elegibilidade para o recebimento de pagamentos por desempenho. O Brasil foi o primeiro país a submeter um FREL para avaliação de especialistas indicados pela UNFCCC em junho de 2014, dando início à implementação do Marco de Varsóvia para REDD+. O FREL submetido pelo Brasil passou por rigoroso processo de avaliação no âmbito da UNFCCC entre agosto e novembro de 2014. Esse processo facilitativo, contribuiu para dar maior transparência à submissão e identificou também áreas onde o Brasil poderia priorizar seus esforços de desenvolvimento técnico. O Brasil espera que mais países em desenvolvimento submetam seus FRELs e que países desenvolvidos se comprometam com o pagamento por resultados, para garantir a efetiva contribuição de REDD+ para a mitigação da mudança global do clima.

Portuguese External link

Other October 2015

The Implementation of the Warsaw Framework for REDD+ by Brazil

Brazil was the first country to submit a forest reference emission level for results based payments to the UNFCCC. This submission has triggered the implementation of the Warsaw Framework for REDD+.

English External link

October 2015

REDD+ na Convencao Quadro das Nacoes Unidas sobre Mudanca do Clima (UNFCCC)

Em 2013, a assinatura do denominado Marco de Varsóvia para REDD+ (the Warsaw Framework for REDD+) cria, sob a Convenção-Quadro das Nações Unidas sobre Mudança do Clima (UNFCCC), uma arquitetura internacional destinada a prover incentivos financeiros a atividades REDD+. O Marco de Varsóvia para REDD+ estabelece os requisitos para o reconhecimento de resultados de mitigação da perda florestal nos países em desenvolvimento, bem como as maneiras pelas quais eles poderão obter pagamentos por resultados. Para receberem o pagamento por resultado, os países em desenvolvimento devem submeter seus níveis de referência de emissões florestais à avaliação de especialistas internacionais selecionados pela UNFCCC. Será estruturado um portal de informação (information hub) da plataforma de REDD+ da UNFCCC (d ecisão 9/ CP.19). O portal divulgará: resultados em toneladas de gás carbônico equivalente e link para os relatórios finais das análises do anexo técnico; os níveis de referência avaliados e link para os relatórios do time de avaliação; relatórios resumidos sobre o cumprimento das salvaguardas de Cancun; link para Estratégia Nacional para REDD+ e informação sobre o sistema nacional de monitoramento conforme Anexo Técnico.

Portuguese External link

October 2015

REDD+ e povos indígenas

Povos indígenas estão entre os atores mais atingidos por efeitos indiretos da mudança do clima, tais como secas prolongadas, incêndios florestais, pragas e doenças. Além disso, o desmatamento em terras indígenas é menor do que em áreas com outros usos em uma mesma região, possuindo assim papel estratégico nas ações de REDD+. Troca de visões e experiências sobre REDD+ e sua interface com relação às políticas indígenas e indigenistas são de extrema importância para um delineamento eficiente de ações e garantia de seus co-benefícios. A Política Nacional de Gestão Territorial e Ambiental de Terras Indígenas (PNGATI) figura como importante marco legal para promover a proteção de recursos renováveis em terras indígenas, garantindo a qualidade de vida de suas populações.

Portuguese External link

May 2013

General Overview on Co-benefits of REDD+ implementation

English PDF 2.09 MB

The Center for People and Forests (RECO... July 2013

Forests and Climate Change after Doha: An Asia-Pacific Perspective

English PDF 1.58 MB

The Forests Dialogue (TFD) July 2013

REDD+ Benefit Sharing Dialogue United States 23-24 March 2013 - Washington D.C. United States Co-chair's Summary

English PDF 344.50 KB

The Forests Dialogue (TFD) July 2013

REDD+ Benefit Sharing Dialogue United States 23-24 March 2013 - Washington D.C. United States Background Paper

English PDF 158.43 KB

Conservation International (CI) January 2013

Performance-Based REDD+ and the Role of Non-Carbon Benefits

English PDF 68.04 KB

World Wide Fund for Nature (WWF) November 2012

External Policy Brief: UNFCCC-COP18 - Overall Expectations for REDD+

English PDF 155.30 KB

World Wide Fund for Nature (WWF) November 2012

UN-Klimakonferenz 2012 COP 18 in Doha, Katar Die Erwartungen des WWF

German PDF 122.37 KB

Conservation International (CI) January 2013

Safeguard Information Systems (SIS): An Opportunity for REDD+ Countries and Donors Alike

English PDF 209.59 KB

October 2015

Salvaguardas de REDD+

De modo inédito, a Convenção Quadro das Nações Unidas sobre Mudanças do Clima (UNFCCC, em inglês) adotou, em sua decisão 1/CP.16, um conjunto de sete salvaguardas voltadas a REDD+ a serem adotadas e respeitadas pelos países, de modo a abordar os impactos diretos e indiretos, positivos e negativos de ações de REDD+. No Brasil, já existem ações e iniciativas no sentido de garantir e promover as salvaguardas de REDD+ e o país emprega esforços para constituir um sistema nacional de informação sobre como as salvaguardas serão tratadas e respeitadas, levando em conta as bases de dados já existentes.

Portuguese External link

The Center for People and Forests (RECO... August 2012

Forests and climate change after Durban: An Asia-Pacific perspective

English PDF 1.56 MB

Global Witness February 2012

Safeguarding REDD+ Finance

English PDF 451.14 KB

German NGO Forum on Environment and Dev... February 2012

Policy paper on REDDplus

The German NGO Forum on Environment and Development has recently developed a policy Paper on REDDplus.

English PDF 230.79 KB

The Center for People and Forests (RECO... May 2011

Forests and Climate Change after Lima: An Asia-Pacific Perspective

English PDF 1.38 MB

The Forests Dialogue (TFD) May 2010

TFD Review - Investing in REDD-plus - Consensus Recommendations on Frameworks for the Financing of REDD-plus

Over the year 2009, The Forest Dialogue (TFD) has held three international dialogues and one writing workshop on Financing REDD-plus, which engaged 100 leaders from different stakeholder groups. These stakeholders include indigenous peoples, family forest owners, industry, academics, IGOs, ENGOs, trade unions, social NGOs, forest industry, forest and carbon investors, retailers and government representatives. The TFD's dialogue initiative on Financing REDD-plus focused on the elements of a framework for REDD financing and implementation. The consensus reached during this initiative has led to 26 recommendations launched on October 1st, 2009, during the UNFCCC Climate Change Talks in Bangkok, Thailand. The recommendations were fed into the processes of the Informal Working Group on Interim Finance for REDD+ (IWG-IFR). A more extensive report on TFD’s initiative on investing in REDD-plus was published in June, 2010, which captures not only the 26 recommendations but also other key issues that have been discussed under this stream of dialogue.

English PDF 2.00 MB

Conservation International (CI) July 2010

What is needed to make REDD+ work on the ground? Lessons learned from pilot forest carbon initiatives

In this report, Conservation International provides an in-depth analysis of 12 pilot forest carbon initiatives in which it has been involved as partner, in order to provide preliminary insights into what will be needed to make REDD+ work on the ground. Located in nine countries throughout Asia, Latin America and Africa, these initiatives represent a broad range of geographic, socioeconomic and biophysical conditions and provide a unique opportunity to examine the challenges and opportunities of designing and implementing forest carbon initiatives in different countries. By providing a holistic and fine-scale analysis of Conservation International’s experiences in implementing reforestation and REDD+ initiatives on the ground, this study reveals many of the real-world challenges that project managers and policy makers will likely face as they design and implement new REDD+ initiatives , and provide practical recommendations of how to enhance the chances of successful design and implementation in the field that result in the provision of climate, community and biodiversity benefits.

English PDF 1.79 MB

Conservation International (CI) July 2010

促使REDD+机制切 实发挥作用,尚有 哪些欠缺? 由森林碳汇试点项目得 到的经验 执行纲要及建议

Chinese PDF 1.13 MB

Conservation International (CI) July 2010

What is needed to make REDD+ work on the ground? Lessons learned from pilot forest carbon initiatives Executive Summary + Recommendations

English PDF 873.58 KB

Conservation International (CI) July 2010

¿Qué se necesita para hacer REDD+ funcionar en el campo? Lecciones aprendidas de iniciativas piloto de carbono forestal Resumen Ejecutivo + Recomendaciones

Spanish PDF 917.45 KB

Conservation International (CI) July 2010

De quoi le mécanisme REDD+ a-t-il besoin pour fonctionner sur le terrain? Retour d’expérience d’initiatives pilotes de carbone forestier Synthèse + Recommandations

French PDF 952.37 KB

Conservation International (CI) July 2010

O que é necessário para fazer o REDD+ funcionar em campo? Lições aprendidas em iniciativas florestais de carbono Sumário Executivo + Recomendações

Portuguese PDF 934.02 KB

The Center for People and Forests (RECO... June 2010

Forests and Climate Change after Copenhagen: An Asia-Pacific Perspective

Following COP15, forestry stakeholders have raised many questions about the meaning of the Copenhagen outcome for people, forests, and forestry. FAO and RECOFTC recently brought together 12 experts in Bali to debate the issue and provide answers to a dozen key questions.

English PDF 1.64 MB

July 2010

Rapport du atelier de sensibilisation et consultation des Parties prenantes de la province du Katanga sur le processus REDD en RD Congo tenu a Lubumbashi

French PDF 220.19 KB

July 2010

Coordination Nationale REDD de la République Démocratique du Congo - Rapport des ateliers de pré-validation et de validation de la RPP

French PDF 502.31 KB

July 2010

The REDD+ challenge in DRC - presentation at Forest Day 3, COP 15 at Copenhagen

English PDF 1.74 MB

July 2010

La RDC face au défi REDD+ - État d'avancement de l'ONU-REDD en RDC, presentation at side event: developpement de l'initiative REDD en Afrique Centrale, COP 15 at Copenhagen

French PDF 161.14 KB

Carbon Planet December 2009

The History of REDD policy - Kyoto to Copenhagen

A comprehensive summary of the history of REDD policy, from its roots in the Kyoto Protocol, December 1997, to the final meetings of the AWG-LCA and SBSTA before COP15 in Copenhagen in December 2009. The white paper discusses the genesis of REDD policy and provides an overview of major turning points in the key issues of contention in international REDD policy: -The scope of the definition of reducing emissions from deforestation and degradation; -Carbon Accounting for REDD - Measurement, Reporting and Verification; -The rights of Indigenous People; -Financing options for REDD; -Institutional arrangements - Should REDD be a NAMA or project based.

English PDF 225.84 KB

July 2010

La RDC face au défi REDD, présentation aux Nations-Unies, réunion de l'equipe pays

French PDF 791.76 KB

Global Canopy Programme (GCP) December 2009

The Little REDD+ Book

An updated guide to governmental and non-governmental proposals for reducing emissions from deforestation and degradation.

English PDF 1.79 MB

Conservation International (CI) January 2013

Opportunities for achieving biodiversity conservation through REDD

The United Nations climate negotiations on reducing emissions from deforestation and degradation (REDD) provide a rare opportunity for conservation of tropical forests and biodiversity. Here, we explore the implications of REDD design and implementation options on biodiversity conservation and ways to link REDD with biodiversity conservation. From both a mitigation and biodiversity perspective, the most important immediate steps are to ensure that REDD is included in the new global climate agreement and maximizes the area of tropical forest conserved. It may also be possible to include guidelines or incentives within a REDD framework or in national implementation to channel funding to areas of high biodiversity. However, if the immediate steps above are not taken first, REDD will reach neither its mitigation nor its biodiversity conservation potential.

English PDF 119.46 KB

Panos London January 2010

Reporting REDD - A Journalist's Guide to the Role of Forests in Combating Global Climate Change

Produced by Panos London as part of the Climate Change Media Partnership, this media pack aims to give journalists an overview of a vital issue in global climate change negotiations. REDD - reducing emissions from deforestation and forest degradation in developing countries - is a proposed mechanism to slow the loss of forests, but how it will work in practice is proving controversial, raising complex and emotive issues of national sovereignty, human rights, big money and corruption. The pack outlines the key debates and looks at the possible complexities involved such as the sheer scale of the mechanism, and the difficulties there might be in measuring the amount of carbon being saved.

English PDF 758.80 KB

Amazonas Sustainable Foundation (FAS) November 2010

The Costs of REDD: Lessons from Amazonas

The Amazonas Sustainable Foundation is a public-private, independent and non-profit, non-governmental institution of public interest and without political party connections. It was founded in December, 2007, by the Amazonas State Government and the Bradesco Bank, according to its bylaws, approved by the State Public Ministry, in the title recorded at civil registry, according to federal and state laws.

English PDF 333.42 KB

Convention on Biological Diversity (CBD) February 2010

REDD-plus & Biodiversity e-Newsletter Volume 6

English PDF 171.77 KB

The Forests Dialogue (TFD) December 2009

Investing in REDD-plus, Executive summary of The Forest Dialogue consensus

English PDF 74.06 KB

The Forests Dialogue (TFD) December 2009

Investing in REDD-plus, Consensus on frameworks for the financing and implementation of REDD-plus

English PDF 110.60 KB

The Forests Dialogue (TFD) December 2009

Invirtiendo en REDD-plus, Resumen del Consenso del Diálogo Forestal

Spanish PDF 80.85 KB

The Forests Dialogue (TFD) December 2009

Invirtiendo en REDD-plus, Consenso sobre marcos generales para el financiamiento e implementación de mecanismos de REDD-plus

English PDF 121.53 KB

The Forests Dialogue (TFD) December 2009

Investir dans la REDD-plus, Résumé du consensus atteint par The Forest Dialogue

French PDF 75.73 KB

The Forests Dialogue (TFD) December 2009

Investir dans la REDD-plus, Consensus sur les cadres de financement et de l'application de la REDD-plus

French PDF 120.92 KB

The Forests Dialogue (TFD) July 2009

Co-chair's summary report

Built on the outcomes of the first dialogue, TFD continued the discussion on REDD finance in Montreux. Through a facilitated plenary and working group based process, the Montreux Dialogue aimed to apprehend the development on REDD financing on the Climate Change negotiation front, to integrate new developments into the discussion, to reinforce some of the points of consensus and to begin to bridge some of the points of disagreement that arose from the first TFD meeting in New York City. The dialogue is co-hosted by Swiss State Secretariat for Economic Affairs (SECO), supported by Intercooperation.

English PDF 219.51 KB

The Forests Dialogue (TFD) July 2009

Co-chair's summary report

TFD is convening a series of multi-stakeholder dialogues to engage interested stakeholders in a constructive learning and discussion on the options available for the development of future REDD financial mechanisms. Through the dialogue, the participants will understand the various options for REDD financial mechanisms, identify the true fracture lines among stakeholders over the different REDD financial schemes, and begin to develop consensus based solutions to address the challenges to successful implementation. The first dialogue was held in New York City and it will be co-hosted by the UNFCCC Secretariat.

English PDF 136.65 KB

The Forests Dialogue (TFD) July 2009

TFD Background paper

TFD is convening a series of multi-stakeholder dialogues to engage interested stakeholders in a constructive learning and discussion on the options available for the development of future REDD financial mechanisms. Through the dialogue, the participants will understand the various options for REDD financial mechanisms, identify the true fracture lines among stakeholders over the different REDD financial schemes, and begin to develop consensus based solutions to address the challenges to successful implementation. The first dialogue was held in New York City and it will be co-hosted by the UNFCCC Secretariat.

English PDF 208.86 KB

The Forests Dialogue (TFD) December 2008

Beyond REDD: the Role of Forests in Climate Change

Beginning in December 2007, The Forests Dialogue (TFD) has led a multi-stakeholder dialogue process focused on developing a clear, unified message and common set of principles illustrating the factors and conditions necessary to maximize forests and people’s ability to mitigate and adapt to climate change. The initiative has involved more than 275 diverse leaders representing all stakeholder groups from around the world. The group produced a comprehensive consensus Statement on Forests and Climate Change titled “Beyond REDD: the Role of Forests in Climate Change” that lays out 5 guiding principles and over 100 suggested actions for stakeholders including government climate negotiators. This document also includes 5 Briefing Notes. For more information on TFD’s Forest and Climate Initiative contact TFD’s Executive Director, Gary Dunning, at < info@theforestsdialogue.org >

English PDF 280.44 KB

Global Canopy Programme (GCP) December 2008

The Little REDD Book Third Edition

The Little REDD Book is a non-partisan guide to governmental and non-governmental proposals for REDD, published by the Global Canopy Programme (GCP). The book, which has been compiled in collaboration with the Prince's Rainforest Project and other key forest stakeholders, presents thirty-three REDD proposals in a simple, non-technical language. For more information on the Little REDD Book or on the GCP, contact Charlie Parker: < c.parker@globalcanopy.org > The Little REDD Book has recently been updated and the third edition of the book is now available. Other language versions of the book in Bahasa Indonesia, French, Portuguese, Spanish and Mandarin are available at: < www.littleREDDbook.org >

English PDF 1.89 MB

Global Canopy Programme (GCP) March 2009

Le Petit Livre Rouge du REDD

The Little REDD Book is a non-partisan guide to governmental and non-governmental proposals for REDD, published by the Global Canopy Programme (GCP). The book, which has been compiled in collaboration with the Prince's Rainforest Project and other key forest stakeholders, presents thirty-three REDD proposals in a simple, non-technical language. For more information on the Little REDD Book or on the GCP, contact Charlie Parker: < c.parker@globalcanopy.org > The Little REDD Book has recently been updated and the third edition of the book is now available. Other language versions of the book in Bahasa Indonesia, French , Portuguese, Spanish and Mandarin are available at: < www.littleREDDbook.org >

French PDF 1.50 MB

Center for International Forestry Resea... February 2009

Info Brief: Financing REDD: Linking country needs and financing sources

English PDF 559.37 KB

Center for International Forestry Resea... February 2009

Moving ahead with REDD: Issues, options and implications

English PDF 1.62 MB

Center for International Forestry Resea... February 2009

Info Brief: The role of REDD in stabilising greenhouse gas concentrations: Lessons from economic models

English PDF 805.91 KB

November 2008

USAID's biodiversity conservation and forestry programs, FY 2007

USAID, along with the U.S. Department of State, spends approximately $90 million annually to reduce deforestation, increase sequestration, and enhance sustainable forest management. Some examples of USAID programs include: -Spending $30 million annually for conservation in the Amazon, including the Initiative for Conservation in the Andean Amazon and over $100 million since 2002 to targeted conservation programs as part of the Congo Basin Forest Partnership. -Working with the Center for International Forestry (CIFOR) to create a suite of training modules on topics related to forests and climate change, including modules on carbon accounting, forest management, trading carbon from forests, and international policy. -Assessing forest conservation and natural resources management programs – in countries such as Indonesia, Liberia and Bolivia – to see how they can be redesigned, to better incorporate forest climate practices and policies.

English PDF 6.55 MB

Organisation for Economic Co-operation ... December 2008

Financing Mechanisms to Reduce Emissions from Deforestation: Issues in Design and Implementation

The OECD in Paris, France, under the auspices of the Annex I Expert Group (AIXG) on the UNFCCC, has elaborated the following three documents on REDD: -Financing Mechanisms to Reduce Emissions from Deforestation: Issues in Design and Implementation -Incentives to Reduce GHG Emissions from Deforestation: Lessons Learned from Costa Rica and Mexico -Initial Review of Policies and Incentives to Reduce GHG Emissions from Deforestation The OECD also convened a workshop on 26 March 2008 on Incentives to Capture the Carbon and Biodiversity for Reducing Deforestation: Linkages, Synergies and Limitations. Links to the workshop agenda, all presentations and the Chair's summary are available at: < www.oecd.org/env/biodiversity >; For more information on the OECD work on REDD, contact Katia Karousakis at: < katia.karousakis@oecd.org >

English PDF 535.60 KB

Organisation for Economic Co-operation ... December 2008

Incentives to Reduce GHG Emissions from Deforestation: Lessons Learned from Costa Rica and Mexico

The OECD in Paris, France, under the auspices of the Annex I Expert Group (AIXG) on the UNFCCC, has elaborated the following three documents on REDD: -Financing Mechanisms to Reduce Emissions from Deforestation: Issues in Design and Implementation -Incentives to Reduce GHG Emissions from Deforestation: Lessons Learned from Costa Rica and Mexico -Initial Review of Policies and Incentives to Reduce GHG Emissions from Deforestation The OECD also convened a workshop on 26 March 2008 on Incentives to Capture the Carbon and Biodiversity for Reducing Deforestation: Linkages, Synergies and Limitations. Links to the workshop agenda, all presentations and the Chair's summary are available at: < www.oecd.org/env/biodiversity >; For more information on the OECD work on REDD, contact Katia Karousakis at: < katia.karousakis@oecd.org >

English PDF 500.01 KB