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World Wide Fund for Nature (WWF)

Organization information

The WWF Forest and Climate Programme is committed to realizing the conservation and livelihood benefits of REDD+. REDD+ should not only be recognized at the global level, but should also be defined and owned at the national level by tropical forest countries, and at the local level by the very communities that will most directly experience its impact.

The Forest and Climate Programme:

  • Influences international REDD+ policy and funding
  • Develops models of zero net deforestation and degradation (ZNDD) landscapes
  • Makes REDD+ work for indigenous peoples and local communities
  • Provides capacity building and learning support

Submissions made by the World Wide Fund for Nature (WWF)

May 2017

Conservação das Florestas para Combater as Mudanças Climáticas

Em dezembro de 2015, com a assinatura do Acordo de Paris, as nações do mundo chegaram a um acordo histórico, abrangente e coletivo para combater as mudanças climáticas. O objetivo principal do acordo no âmbito da Convenção-Quadro das Nações Unidas sobre Mudança do Clima – CQNUMC (em inglês, United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change – UNFCCC) é manter o aumento da temperatura média global abaixo de 2° C em relação aos níveis pré-industriais, buscando esforços para que este aumento não passe de 1,5° C. O referido acordo reconhece o papel fundamental das florestas, incluindo ações para deter e reverter as taxas de desmatamento e de degradação florestal nos países em desenvolvimento, que têm contribuído com até 20% das emissões anuais de gases de efeito estufa. Para ajudar os países nessas ações, o acordo inclui uma estrutura de políticas e de incentivos para reduzir o desmatamento e a degradação florestal e aumentar o armazenamento de carbono nas florestas por meio da conservação e da gestão sustentável, o que inclui ações relacionadas ao REDD+.

Portuguese External link

May 2017

Conservar los bosques para combatir el cambio climático

En diciembre del 2015, con la firma del Acuerdo de París, las naciones del mundo llegaron a un consenso sobre un enfoque histórico, colectivo y exhaustivo para combatir el cambio climático. El objetivo principal del acuerdo, conforme a la Convención Marco de las Naciones Unidas sobre el Cambio Climático (CMNUCC), es mantener el aumento de la temperatura media mundial muy por debajo de los 2 °C con respecto a los niveles preindustriales, e intentar limitar el aumento a 1.5 °C. El acuerdo reconoce el papel fundamental de los bosques y de las acciones para detener y revertir la tasa de deforestación y degradación forestal en los países en desarrollo, que han aportado hasta el 20 % de las emisiones anuales de gases de efecto invernadero. Con el fn de ayudar a los países a efectuar estas acciones, el acuerdo incluye un marco de políticas e incentivos para reducir la deforestación y la degradación forestal, y aumentar el almacenamiento de carbono en los bosques mediante la conservación y el manejo sostenible. Este marco se conoce como REDD+.

Spanish External link

May 2017

Mapping REDD+: A visual guide to UNFCCC decisions

Mapping REDD+: A visual guide to UNFCCC decisions, an all-inclusive resource for REDD+ negotiators, practitioners, policy makers, and funders. REDD+ is ready for implementation, and a thorough understanding of relevant UNFCCC articles and decisions is needed to move forward and scale up action. In this comprehensive resource, we visually map the UNFCCC articles and decisions related to REDD+, and the connections between them, presenting all relevant decisions within one user-friendly document. The information is grouped into categories for easy reference regarding the subsets of REDD+ themes – such as finance, safeguards, and MRV – to ensure the highest levels of clarity and accessibility. The majority of the text is taken verbatim from official UNFCCC decisions, including citations, so readers can refer back to the original documents for additional context. Mapping REDD+ is a complete source of the relevant articles and decisions needed to make informed and UNFCCC-compliant decisions, for anyone working within the REDD+ framework, from planning, to finance, to implementation.

English External link

May 2017

Conserver les forêts pour lutter contre le changement climatique

En décembre 2015, avec la signature de l’Accord de Paris, les pays du monde entier se sont accordés sur une approche historique, collective et complète pour lutter contre le changement climatique. Le principal objectif de l’accord, sous la Convention-cadre des Nations Unies sur le changement climatique (CCNUCC) est de maintenir la montée de la température moyenne de par le monde bien en-deçà de 2oC au-dessus des niveaux préindustriels et d’essayer de limiter l’augmentation à 1,5oC. Au sein de cet accord se trouve la reconnaissance du rôle essentiel des forêts, y compris des actions visant à arrêter la déforestation et la dégradation de la forêt et à inverser leur rythme dans les pays en développement. La déforestation et la dégradation de la forêt contribuent jusqu’à hauteur de 20% aux émissions de gaz à effet de serre. Pour accompagner les pays dans ces actions, l’accord inclut un cadre de politiques et d’incitations pour la réduction de la déforestation et de la dégradation de la forêt, ainsi que l’augmentation des stocks de carbone dans les forêts par le biais de la conservation et d’une gestion durable. C’est ce que l’on appelle la REDD+.

French External link

November 2016

Lessons Learned and Recommendations from Early UNFCCC REDD+ Reference Levels Submissions

Produced in partnership with Environmental Defense Fund, International Union for the Conservation of Nature, The Nature Conservancy, and Union of Concerned Scientists, this paper presents lessons learned and best practice recommendations from an unprecedented workshop convening of two groups of experts: 1) those from REDD+ countries who were involved in creating FRLs/FRELs, and 2) those who had served as members of the Technical Team of Experts performing technical analysis of REDD+ results. Forest Reference Levels/Forest Reference Emissions Levels (FRLs/FRELs) are critical to the policy framework for Reducing Emissions from Deforestation and forest Degradation (REDD+), and provide the benchmark against which countries measure their results from REDD+ implementation. FRLs/FRELs are still incipient, and REDD+ countries and technical assessors are still in a learning-by-doing process, generating valuable lessons that are worth sharing.

English External link

November 2016

Jurisdictional Approaches to Zero Deforestation Commodities

Increasing numbers of governments, foundations, NGOs, and companies are looking to jurisdictional scale approaches as ways to help deliver sustainable and deforestation-free agricultural commodities. Jurisdictional approaches to zero-deforestation commodities (JA-ZDCs) lie at the intersection of three existing strategies to reduce forest loss and degradation, along with improving the health and sustainability of rural and frontier economies: landscape approaches, jurisdictional approaches, and voluntary corporate sustainability efforts. These three strategies are increasingly converging. This WWF discussion paper maps the current landscape of why, where, who, and how actors are approaching this convergence, based on more than twenty-five interviews with thought leaders in this space. We find that: - There are at least a few dozen examples of JA-ZDCs; however, most are relatively nascent in their development - These approaches take many different angles – including ’bottom-up‘ multi-stakeholder initiatives, global demand-side signals for commodities produced in reduced-deforestation jurisdictions, and place-based supply-side signals, e.g., in the form of jurisdictional certifications - Though there is a mix of enthusiasm and caution about the potential of JA-ZDCs, most interviewees view them as a challenging but promising development to help drive governments and commodity businesses (especially producers) to the table to establish shared goals and pathways to achieving them Key priorities looking forward will include continued experimentation, innovation, and knowledge sharing from early initiatives; increased opportunities for forest country governments to articulate specifically what they need from private sector actors to achieve sustainable development goals and climate targets; and increased technical work to identify how to scale and/or overlay farm- and plantation-level standards and progress in traceability with jurisdictional approaches that engage governments and incentivize land policy reform and/or implementation more broadly.

English External link

November 2016

Conserving Forests to Combat Climate Change

In December 2015, the Paris Agreement recognized the critical role of forests in combating climate change. This recognition included actions to halt and reverse the rate of deforestation and forest degradation in developing countries, which have contributed up to 20 percent of annual greenhouse gas emissions. To assist countries in these actions, the agreement includes a framework of policies and incentives for reducing deforestation and forest degradation and increasing carbon storage in forests through conservation and sustainable management. This is known as REDD+, a mechanism that has evolved over a decade of discussions, research, and negotiations to become a key piece of the newly adopted climate architecture. The aim of REDD+ is to halt and reverse forest cover and carbon loss in developing countries by helping countries shift to low-emissions development pathways by increasing the value of healthy forests relative to other land uses. Achieving and sustaining the objectives of REDD+ requires the transformation of economic activities within and outside of forests, often referred to as the drivers of deforestation and forest degradation. A solid understanding of REDD+ and the Paris Agreement is needed to accomplish these economic transformations and conserve forests as natural places, carbon stocks, and sustainable resources. This paper describes what REDD+ is, in a manner that is accessible to policy makers, scientists and civil society and in a form that is completely consistent with the UNFCCC decisions and agreements.

English External link

January 2016

INDC Analysis: An Overview of the Forest Sector

Current commitments to reduce greenhouse-gas emissions fall far short of what is needed to prevent dangerous levels of climate change. According to the United Nations Environment Programme, the Intended Nationally Determined Contributions (INDCs) submitted by countries to date would likely result in a catastrophic global average temperature rise of 3-3.5°C, even if all conditional targets were met. But more ambitious action to protect forests and restore degraded lands could go a long way towards closing the gap between current proposals and what science says is needed. WWF’s report INDC Analysis: An Overview of the Forest Sector looks at the plans countries have laid out for reducing emissions from forest loss, and identifies opportunities for forest countries and donors to make a bigger contribution. The report analyses the INDCs submitted by 75 developing countries or emerging economies which account for the vast majority of tropical forest cover. “While the proposed measures vary widely, overall countries recognize the vital importance of the forest sector within their INDCs,” said Josefina Brana-Varela, head of policy for WWF’s Forest and Climate Programme. “But to realize the full global mitigation potential, many countries still need to clarify and strengthen their intended forest sector contributions.” Of the INDCs analysed, over half establish one or more concrete goals in the forest sector. These include targets for afforestation, reforestation and restoration; to maintain and/or increase forest cover; for sustainable forest management; and to increase the uptake of improved cook stoves, which use less firewood. The review highlights a number of ways to augment the role that various forest conservation and restoration actions can play in reducing the emissions gap. These actions can also help countries adapt to climate change and achieve wider sustainable development goals. “Forested developing countries should include clear, comprehensive mitigation targets and transparent financial needs in their INDCs,” added Brana-Varela. “This will help forge partnerships with potential donors, and enable them to make a major contribution to closing the emissions gap.”

English External link

January 2016

Forest Reference Level Submissions under REDD+

EDF, TNC, UCS, and WWF’s report Forest Reference Level Submissions under REDD+: An Analysis of Submission Trends, Leading Practices, and Areas for Improvement examines the first six FRLs to be submitted to the UN – by Brazil, Colombia, Ecuador, Guyana, Malaysia and Mexico. It provides an overview of the different approaches these countries have taken to developing their FRLs. It examines some of the shared trends, in order to identify good practices, areas for improvement and lessons learnt. And it examines how effectively they can contribute to delivering real emissions reductions.

English External link

December 2015

Expectations Paper COP21 Paris

The 2015 UN climate change conference in Paris (COP21) is a pivotal moment. Governments have set December 2015 as the deadline to agree on a new climate regime for 2020 onwards. This deal must give the world a fighting chance to avoid dangerous global temperature rises. Such an agreement needs to be fair, ambitious, and transformational. At the same time, COP21 provides an opportunity to showcase efforts that countries, the private sector, and civil society are making to combat climate change – and to accelerate and scale up these actions.

English External link

December 2015

PROJET DE DOCUMENT SUR LES ATTENTES DE LA COP 21 DE PARIS

La conférence de l’ONU sur le changement climatique de 2015 qui se tiendra à Paris (COP21) est un moment charnière. Les États se sont fixé comme date limite décembre 2015 pour s’accorder sur un nouveau régime climat pour la période après 2020.

French External link

December 2015

PROYECTO DE DOCUMENTO DE EXPECTATIVAS DE LA COP 21 DE PARÍS

La Conferencia de las Naciones Unidas sobre el Cambio Climático de 2015 (COP21) es un momento fundamental. Los gobiernos han fijado diciembre de 2015 como plazo para ponerse de acuerdo sobre un nuevo régimen climático para después de 2020.

Spanish External link

October 2015

Expectations for REDD+: UNFCCC-COP20, Lima, Peru December 2014

WWF calls on Parties to the 20th Conference of the Parties to\\r\\nthe United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change\\r\\n(UNFCCC-COP 20) to integrate REDD+ within the broader climate\\r\\narchitecture and address technical issues for REDD+ still under\\r\\ndiscussion under the Subsidiary Body for Scientific and Technical\\r\\nAssistance (SBSTA).

English PDF 527.39 KB

October 2015

ATTENTES POUR LA REDD+ : CCNUCC-COP20, LIMA, PÉROU DÉCEMBRE 2014

Le WWF appelle toutes les Parties à la 20e Conférence des Parties à la Convention-cadre des Nations Unies sur le changement climatique (CCNUCC-COP20) à intégrer la REDD+ au sein de l’architecture plus large du climat et à aborder les questions techniques qui restent en suspens pour la REDD+ et qui font toujours l’objet d’une discussion dans le cadre du processus de l’Organe subsidiaire de conseil scientifique et technique (SBSTA).

French PDF 957.43 KB

October 2015

EXPECTATIVAS PARA REDD+: CMNUCC-COP20, LIMA, PERÚ DICIEMBRE 2014

WWF hace un llamado a los líderes mundiales que participarán de la Vigésima Conferencia de las Partes dela Convención Marco de las Naciones Unidas sobre Cambio Climático (CMNUCC-COP 20) para incluir el mecanismo REDD+ (Reducción de Emisiones por Deforestación y Degradación de los bosques) dentro de una arquitectura climática mucho más amplia, con el fin de abordar los temas técnicos pendientes para REDD+ que aún se encuentran en debate ante el Órgano Subsidiario de Asesoramiento Científico y Tecnológico (SBSTA, por sus siglas en inglés).

Spanish PDF 655.34 KB

November 2012

External Policy Brief: UNFCCC-COP18 - Overall Expectations for REDD+

English PDF 155.30 KB

November 2012

UN-Klimakonferenz 2012 COP 18 in Doha, Katar Die Erwartungen des WWF

German PDF 122.37 KB